IKEA spotlights the cool cat silver gens for latest streetwear launch

IKEA Singapore has hit jackpot once again showcasing its diversity and style for all. In its latest campaign launching the new new EFTERTRÄDA streetwear and accessories collection, the brand worked with  creative agency TBWA\ Singapore to execute a guerilla-style photo shoot around Chinatown featuring talents in their 70’s. These new segment of brand influencers: glam-mas and glam-pas,  as IKEA labells them, not only cut through the clutter in the Singapore ad scene receiving praise from netizens, but also caught the eye of the global CMO of Burger King Fernando Machado - known for leading out of the box campaign executions for the Burger King brand. 

The use of glam-mas and glam-pas (which is a wordplay on grandmas and grandpas if you haven't noticed) as models of its launch campaign comes as IKEA sought to communicate the idea of “style for all” with its streetwear range under EFTERTRÄDA. According to a press release, IKEA said this is in line with its belief that timeless style should be democratic.  As part of the shoot, IKEA allowed the talents to style the streetwear and accessories from its EFTERTRÄDA line in their own way.

Lauren Lim, associate creative director and Germaine Chen, senior art director of TBWA\Singapore, added that the word “influencer” is mostly associated with young, social media obsessed trendsetters “who dictate what’s cool”. IKEA sought to change that perception by featuring older influencers whose personal styles can be a source of inspiration as well. It is the “best way to bring to life IKEA's ethos of democratic style,” they said. MARKETING-INTERACTIVE has reached out for additional information.

EFTERTRÄDA is IKEA’s first merchandising collection line outside of home furnishings that includes streetwear (t-shirts and hoodies) as well as bath towels, water bottles and canvas totes.

Nigel Richardson, head of marketing, IKEA Southeast Asia, said: “IKEA has always believed that everyone should be able to afford good design, and the EFTERTRÄDA range is another great example. We are really pleased to have brought this exciting range to Singapore”.

The rising importance of diversity

IKEA’s choice of featuring older models comes at a time where diversity is getting increasingly importance for brands. According to a Google study done in late 2019, it was found that consumers are more likely to consider, or even purchase, a product after seeing an ad they think is diverse or inclusive. The diverse representation can come in 12 different categories: gender identity, age, body type, race/ethnicity, culture, sexual orientation, skin tone, language, religious/spiritual affiliation, physical ability, socio-economic status, and overall appearance.

The Google study also showed that 64% of those surveyed said they took some sort of action after seeing an ad that they consider diverse. “This study clearly told us that these consumers expect brands to be inclusive and reflect the reality of their lives in advertising,” Virginia Lennon, senior VP of the multicultural center for excellence at market research company Ipsos said.

Separately, Google said earlier this year in March that one of the top trends of consumer behaviour in APAC is genuine inclusivity, where consumers desire more for genuinely inclusive products and services that embrace their unique identities.

Diversity has been a huge topic this year. Earlier this year there was the #BlackLivesMatter movement which shone light on the topic of racism and police brutality. The movement saw many brands declaring their stance in being inclusive and diverse in their hiring and operations, with some receiving backlash for their efforts. The beauty industry also took a step towards inclusivity, with brands replacing the term “fair” with “glow” in their products, after garnering heat for playing up insecurities in skin tones and promoting negative stereotypes against darker skinned women. We also saw brands in SEA such as Grab and Great Eastern shining the spotlight on the less-abled community, with campaigns aimed to empower the deaf community and inspire others to overcome their disabilities.

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